Helge Blakkisrud

Senior Research Fellow (part time)

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Helge Blakkisrud’s main research interests include Russian federalism and centre–region relations, in particular, the development of the institution of governors. Research interests also include Russia's High North/Arctic policy, nationality policy and Russian nationalism, as well as processes of state-building and nation-building in Eurasia, especially in Eurasian de facto states.

Blakkisrud is editor of Nordisk Østforum, a Nordic peer-reviewed journal for Russian and East European studies. 

He has been a guest lecturer at the OSCE Academy, Bishkek, since 2008. In 2009–2010, he was a Fulbright Visiting Fellow at UC Berkeley.


EDUCATION:

1996- PhD-programme (Political Science), University of Oslo

1995 Cand.Polit. (Political Science) from University of Oslo. Dissertation: De russiske minoritetene i Estland og Latvia. Minoriteters responsstrategier ved endrede rammebetingelser

WORK EXPERIENCE:

1995   Senior Research Fellow/Head of Research Group on Russia, Asia and International Trade, NUPI

2018 - Part time position, Norwegian University Centre, St Petersburg

1995 - OSCE Election Observer (various elections in Russia, Armenia, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Ukraine and Bosnia-Herzegovina)

1994 - Editor in Chief, Nordisk Østforum (Nordic Journal of East European and Post-Soviet Studies

1994   Member of the CSSE Mission in Latvia. Leader of the Mission's mobile team

Publications All publications

Projects All projects

Events All events

  • How Important Are Traditional Values for Putin’s Support?
    Event
    Tue 30 Aug 2022
    Time: 09:00 Europe/Oslo | Location: NUPI

    May Putin in fact be losing more support than he is winning when he “talks conservative”?

  • Protest Potentials and Protest Realities: The Gap Between Intent and Action in Russia in 2022
    Event
    Mon 9 May 2022
    Time: 11:00 Europe/Oslo | Location: C.J. Hambrosplass 2 D / Livestream to Facebook and Youtube

    Russian societal response to Putin’s war with Ukraine is hard to gauge. Anecdotal evidence and livestreams of pro-regime rallies suggests a consolidation around the state and President Putin, while evidence from protest and everyday resistance suggests growing opposition. How do we interpret these conflicting signals in a closed system?

  • WEBINAR: Renegotiating patron support for Nagorno-Karabakh after the 2020 war
    Event
    Fri 3 Dec 2021
    Time: 10:00 Europe/Oslo | Location: Livestream to Facebook and Youtube

    Last autumn, in a matter of weeks, the Nagorno-Karabakh Armenians lost two-thirds of the territory they had controlled since 1994. In the end, only Russian intervention stopped a full reabsorption of Nagorno-Karabakh into Azerbaijan. How has this affected regional power constellations?

  • De Facto States and Land-for-Peace Agreements: Territory and Recognition at Odds?
    Event
    Tue 5 Oct 2021
    Time: 14:00 Europe/Oslo | Location: C.J. Hambrosplass 2 D / Livestream to Facebook and Youtube

    Sovereignty conflicts are inevitably linked to geography. Can there be geographical solutions to secessionist conflicts, which are caught between two principles at cross purposes: the principle of self-determination (defended by de facto states) and the principle of territorial integrity (defended by parent states)?

  • Mixed Signals: What Putin Says about Gender Equality
    Event
    Thu 27 May 2021
    Time: 16:30 Europe/Oslo | Location: Microsoft Teams

    Researchers on Russia have noticed that Putin gradually has adopted a more conservative agenda, especially as regards gender issues. But is this reflected in the Russian president's own rhetoric?

Articles All articles